What is the best toothbrush for seniors? Is it a toothbrush with a good grip? The old-fashioned manual type? The electric type? Does the way the toothbrush looks, matter to how often we brush our teeth? Well, we might be influenced by how a toothbrush looks. These days you can get toothbrushes in such great variety, that seniors can be spoiled for choice!

Here is a short guide about choosing the best toothbrush for seniors.

 

Most Important Thing About Brushing the Teeth

ToothWisdom  points out that the most important part of brushing your teeth is not the toothpaste. It is the brushing motion. That brushing cleans out little bits of food and plaque from the teeth. That is the way to avoid decay.

 

The Main Features of a Good Toothbrush

These are from ToothWisdom and Colgate:

Look for a toothbrush that:

  • Has soft bristles – you want to clean the teeth, but not damage the gums
  • Is easy to hold – you need to brush well without the toothbrush slipping from your hand
  • Has a smaller head – to be able to reach more places

 

A Toothbrush for Easy Grip

Buy a toothbrush that has a special non-slip grip or has a chunky handle. You can wrap a small towel or Styrofoam material held with electrical tape, around the handle of a regular toothbrush.

 

 

Non-Powered Brushes

The American Dental Association says that powered and non-powered brushes can work just as well in cleaning the teeth if one brushes properly.

Nowadays you can get brushes that are 3-sided. This means that you do not need to twist your wrist in all directions in order to brush all sides.

The advantage is that these manual brushes can be inexpensive. When they are worn out no one feels bad throwing them out. Similarly, after a cold, brush bristles can keep in the bacteria. It is so easy to replace a toothbrush.

You don’t have to remember to charge them or buy batteries for them.

Manual toothbrushes also come in a vast variety of styles and colors, which can add pleasure to the brushing.

 

Nevertheless, powered brushes are highly recommended and have increased n popularity. The Washington Post provides that Americans spend around $1.5 billion on toothbrushes a year. $850 million goes on manual toothbrushes, $700 on electric toothbrushes.

 

Powered Toothbrushes

These save you the work of up and down brushing. This is good for a senior with restricted movement. Caregivers also prefer electric brushes. Some toothbrushes come with an automatic 2-minute timer. That means the user knows until when to brush.

There are several surveys on which electric brush is the best.

Health.com presents their recommendation

NYMag.com presents their findings

AnimatedTeeth.com has these for best toothbrush for seniors

 

Having healthy teeth means you can eat better, feel good about yourself and avoid multiple trips to the dentist.

Don’t let weak grip or reduced dexterity get to your teeth.

Brushing twice a day and using floss where possible, once a day will keep your teeth as healthy as can be.

The best toothbrush for seniors is a matter of debate. Usually, the one that is the most comfortable for you, is the best one to get. The real best toothbrush for seniors, is the one that will be used daily!

 

The best toothbrush for seniors - the one you use!

 

Photo by Anastasiia Ostapovych on Unsplash

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